Osteoporosis

Case Studies supporting PEMF benefits for Osteoporosis

Clinical update of pulsed electromagnetic fields on osteoporosis

Abstract

Objective: To understand the effects of low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on chronic bone pain, bone mineral density (BMD), bone strength and biochemical markers of bone metabolism in the patients of osteoporosis.

Data sources: Using the key words “pulsed electromagnetic fields” and “osteoporosis”, we searched the PubMed for related studies published in English from January 1996 to December 2007. We also searched the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) for studies published in Chinese from January 1996 to December 2007.

Study selection: Inclusion criteria: (1) all articles which referred to the effects of low-frequency pulsed magnetic fields on osteoporosis either in primary osteoporosis or secondary osteoporosis; (2) either observational studies or randomized controlled studies. Exclusion criteria: (1) articles on experimental studies about osteoporosis; (2) repetitive studies; (3) case reports; (4) meta analysis.

Results: Totally 111 related articles were collected, 101 of them were published in Chinese, 10 were in English. Thirty-four were included and the remaining 84 were excluded.

Conclusions: Low-frequency PEMFs relieves the pain of primary osteoporosis quickly and efficiently, enhances bone formation and increases BMD of secondary osteoporosis. But the effects of PEMFs on bone mineral density of primary osteoporosis and bone resorption were controversial.

Effects of short-term resistance training and pulsed electromagnetic fields on bone metabolism and joint function in severe haemophilia A patients with osteoporosis: a randomized controlled trial

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the effects of short-term resistance training and pulsed electromagnetic fields on bone metabolism and joint function in patients with haemophilia with osteoporosis.

Design: A randomized, controlled, patient and blood sample assessor-blinded, six-week trial, three times weekly. Setting: Hospital outpatients with severe haemophilia A and osteoporosis.

Subjects: Forty-eight patients were randomly assigned to resistance training (RT, n = 13), combined resistance training with pulsed electromagnetic fields (RTPEMF, n = 12), pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF, n = 11) and control (n = 12) groups.

Intervention: The RT group received 30–40 minutes of resistance exercises and placebo pulsed electromagnetic fields. The RTPEMF group received the same exercises with lower repetition and 30 minutes of pulsed electromagnetic fields. The PEMF group was exposed to 60 minutes of pulsed electromagnetic fields (30 Hz and 40 Gauss).

Main measures: Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, N-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen, and joint function, using the modified Colorado Questionnaire, were measured before and after the programme.

Results: The absolute change of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase was significant in the RT and RTPEMF groups compared with the control group (25.41 ± 14.40, 15.09 ± 5.51, and −4.73 ± 2.93 U/L, respectively). The absolute changes in the total score for joint function were significant for knees, ankles, and elbows in the RT group (9.2 ± 1.38, 5.1 ± 0.5, and 3.2 ± 0.8, respectively) and the RTPEMF group (7.7 ± 1.0, 3.3 ± 0.6, and 2.5 ± 0.7, respectively) compared to the PEMF and control groups. This value was significant for knee joints in the PEMF group compared to the control group (3.4 ± 0.5 and 0.66 ± 0.4, respectively).

Conclusions: Resistance training is effective for improving bone formation and joint function in severe haemophilia A patients with osteoporosis.

Electromagnetic field versus circuit weight training on bone mineral density in elderly women

Abstract

Background and purpose: Osteoporosis is a common skeletal disorder with costly complications and a global health problem and one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Magnetic field therapy and physical activity have been proven as beneficial interventions for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to compare the response of bone mineral content and bone mineral density (BMD) in elderly women to either low-frequency low-intensity pulsed magnetic field (LFLIPMF) or circuit weight training (CWT) on short-run basis (after 12 weeks).

Patients and methods: Thirty elderly women, aged 60–70 years, were randomly assigned into two groups (magnetic field and CWT) (n=15 each group). The session was performed three times per week for magnetic field and CWT groups, for 12 weeks. BMD and bone mineral content of lumbar spine (L2–L4) and femoral neck, trochanter, and Ward’s triangle were evaluated before and after 12 weeks of treatment.

Results: Both magnetic field and CWT for 12 weeks in elderly women seem to yield beneficial and statistically significant increasing effect on BMD and bone mineral content (P<0.05). But magnetic field seems to have more beneficially and statistically significant effect than does CWT.

Conclusion: It is possible to conclude that LFLIPMF and CWT programs are effective modalities in increasing BMD but LFLIPMF is more effective in elderly women.

The effect of magnetic therapy and active exercise on bone mineral density in elderly women with osteoporosis

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of pulsed electro-magnetic therapy and exercise training on bone mineral density (BMD) in elderly women with osteoporosis.

Material and Methods: A total of 30 elderly women with osteoporosis aged from 60 to 70 years old were randomly divided into two groups: A magnetic group consisting of 15 women who received pulsed electro-magnetic therapy at a frequency of 33 Hz and an intensity of 50 gauss for 50 min per session and an exercise group consisting of 15 women who practiced active exercises that included treadmill walking and selected exercises for hip and back muscles for 50 min per session. Both interventions were applied for three sessions/week for three months at a physical therapy clinic. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure the BMD of the neck of the femur and the lumbar spine (L3-L5) before and after intervention.

Results: Statistical analysis revealed that the BMD of the neck of the femur and the lumbar spine significantly increased in the two groups without a significant difference between them.

Conclusion: Pulsed electro-magnetic therapy and exercises can increase BMD at the neck of the femur and the lumbar spine in elderly women. Physical therapists could apply pulsed electro-magnetic therapy or exercise training to increase BMD in elderly women.

Case Study Reference Source:

  • 1. Clinical update of pulsed electromagnetic fields on osteoporosis
    (Authors: HUANG Li-qun, HE Hong-chen, HE Cheng-qi, CHEN Jian and YANG Lin)

  • 2. Effects of short-term resistance training and pulsed electromagnetic fields on bone metabolism and joint function in severe haemophilia A patients with osteoporosis: a randomized controlled trial
    (Authors: Behrouz Parhampour, Giti Torkaman, Hamid Hoorfar, Mehdi Hedayati and Roya Ravanbod)

  • 3. Electromagnetic field versus circuit weight training on bone mineral density in elderly women
    (Authors: Hany Farid Eid Morsy Elsisi, Gihan Samir Mohamed Mousa, Mohamed Taher Mahmoud ELdesoky)

  • 4. The effect of magnetic therapy and active exercise on bone mineral density in elderly women with osteoporosis
    (Authors: Al-Sayed A. Shanb, Enas F. Youssef, Mohamed G. El-Barkouky, Rasha M. Kamal and Ahmed M. Tawfick)