Shoulder

Case Studies supporting PEMF benefits for Shoulder

Effect of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields on Human Tenocyte Cultures From Supraspinatus and Quadriceps Tendons

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on human tenocyte cultures and to assess whether PEMFs could represent a viable therapeutic option in tendon pathologies.

Design: Controlled laboratory study in which primary human tenocytes were isolated from healthy supraspinatus and quadriceps tendons and were exposed to the electromagnetic field stimulation. Cell growth and cell cycle were evaluated after 72 hrs, 5 days, and 7 days of continuous PEMF exposure. In quiescent confluent tenocyte culture, an in vitro cut was mechanically produced, and the width of the cell-free zone was measured 12, 24, and 36 hrs after the injury in the presence of PEMF stimulation. Total collagen accumulation was also evaluated after 5, 7, and 14 days of PEMF exposure.

Results: Tenocyte growth analysis, cell cycle analysis, and total collagen accumulation did not show statistically significant differences between exposed and control groups. Exposure to PEMF significantly accelerated cut closure 12 and 24 hrs after the injury.

Conclusions: PEMFs comparable with the ones used for the management of pseudoarthrosis stimulate closure of an in vitro laceration of a tenocyte monolayer. Our results provide the preliminary in vitro work and the basis to support the study of the in vivo effects of PEMFs on tendinopathies.

Effectiveness of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy in lateral epicondylitis

Abstract

We aimed to investigate the efficacy of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) in lateral epicondylitis comparing the modality with sham PEMF and local steroid injection. Sixty patients with lateral epicondylitis were randomly and equally distributed into three groups as follows: Group I received PEMF, Group II sham PEMF, and Group III a corticosteroid + anesthetic agent injection. Pain levels during rest, activity, nighttime, resisted wrist dorsiflexion, and forearm supination were investigated with visual analog scale (VAS). Pain threshold on elbow was determined with algometer. All patients were evaluated before treatment at the third week and the third month. VAS values during activity and pain levels during resisted wrist dorsiflexion were significantly lower in Group III than Group I at the third week. Group I patients had lower pain during rest, activity and nighttime than Group III at third month. PEMF seems to reduce lateral epicondylitis pain better than sham PEMF. Corticosteroid and anesthetic agent injections can be used in patients for rapid return to activities.

Low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields significantly improve time of closure and proliferation of human tendon fibroblasts

Abstract

Background: The promotion of the healing process following musculoskeletal injuries comprises growth factor signalling, migration, proliferation and apoptosis of cells. If these processes could be modulated, the healing of tendon tissue may be markedly enhanced. Here, we report the use of the Somagen™ device, which is certified for medical use according to European laws. It generates low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields that trigger effects of a nature that are yet to be determined.

Methods: A 1.5-cm wide, linear scrape was introduced into patellar tendon fibroblast cultures (N = 5 donors). Treatment was carried out every second day. The regimen was applied three times in total with 30 minutes comprising pulsed electromagnetic field packages with two fundamental frequencies (10 minutes of 33 Hz, 20 minutes of 7.8 Hz). Control cells remained untreated. All samples were analyzed for gap closure time, proliferation and apoptosis one week after induction of the scrape wound.

Results: The mean time for bridging the gap in the nontreated cells was 5.05 ± 0.33 days, and in treated cells, it took 3.35 ± 0.38 days (P <0.001). For cell cultures with scrape wounds, a mean value for BrdU incorporation of OD = 0.70 ± 0.16 was found. Whereas low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields treated samples showed OD = 1.58 ± 0.24 (P <0.001). However, the percentage of apoptotic cells did not differ between the two groups.

Conclusions: Our data demonstrate that low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields emitted by the Somagen™ device influences the in vitro wound healing of patellar tendon fibroblasts and, therefore, possibly increases wound healing potential.

Pulsed Electromagnetic Field and Exercises in Patients With Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effects of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) and exercises in reducing pain and improving function and muscle strength in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS).

Design: Double-blind, randomized controlled trial with a 3-month posttreatment follow-up.

Setting: Outpatient rehabilitation of a public hospital.

Participants: Patients (NZ56) between 40 and 60 years of age, with a diagnosis of SIS, were randomly assigned to receive active PEMF (nZ26; mean age, 50.1y) or placebo PEMF (nZ30; mean age, 50.8y).

Interventions: After 3 weeks of active or placebo PEMF, both groups performed the same program of exercises that focused on shoulder strengthening.

Main Outcome Measures: A visual analog scale, the University of California/Los Angeles shoulder rating scale, the Constant-Murley shoulder score, and handheld dynamometry for muscle strength were used as outcome measures at baseline (pretreatment), at 3 weeks (after active or placebo PEMF), at 9 weeks (postexercise), and at 3 months posttreatment.

Results: Patients in the active PEMF group had a higher level of function and less pain at all follow-up time frames compared with baseline (P<.05). However, the placebo PEMF group had increased function and reduced pain only at the 9-week and 3-month follow-ups (P<.05) that is, after performing the associated exercises. For the shoulder dynamometry, the active PEMF group had increased strength for lateral rotation at 9 weeks (P<.05), and increased strength for medial rotation at 9 weeks and 3 months (both P<.05) when compared with baseline. There was no significant difference for shoulder strength in the placebo PEMF group (P>.05), as well as no significant differences (P>.05) for all outcome measures.

Conclusions: The combination of PEMF and shoulder exercises is effective in improving function and muscle strength and decreasing pain in patients with SIS. However, these results should be carefully interpreted because of the lack of differences between groups.

Aktas I, Akgun K, Cakmak B. Therapeutic effect of pulsed electromagnetic field in conservative treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome

Abstract

Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) is a frequent cause of shoulder pain. Our purpose in this doubleblinded, randomized, and controlled study was to demonstrate whether the pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) provides additional benefit when used with other conservative treatment modalities in acute phase rehabilitation program of SIS. Forty-six patients with unilateral shoulder pain who had been diagnosed as having SIS were included in this trial. The cases were randomly separated into two groups. All cases received a treatment program for 3 weeks consisting of Codman’s pendulum exercises and subsequent cold pack gel application on shoulders with pain 5 times a day, restriction of daily activities that require the hands to be used over the head, and meloxicam tablet 15 mg daily. One group was given PEMF; the other group was given sham PEMF daily, 25 min per session, 5 days per week for 3 weeks. Shoulder pain during rest and activity and which causes disturbance of sleep was evaluated using a visual analogue scale, and total Constant score investigated shoulder function. Daily living activities were evaluated by shoulder disability questionnaire. Results were assessed before and after treatment. When compared with the baseline values, significant improvements in all these variables were observed at the end of the treatment in both groups (p<0.05). No significant difference between treatments was observed for any of these variables (p>0.05). There is no convincing evidence that electromagnetic therapy is of additional benefit in acute phase rehabilitation program of SIS.

Case Study Reference Source:

  • 1. Effect of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields on Human Tenocyte Cultures From Supraspinatus and Quadriceps Tendons
    (Authors: "Vincenzo Denaro, MD", "Laura Ruzzini, MD", "Simona Angela Barnaba, MD", "Umile Giuseppe Longo, MD", "Stefano Campi, MD", "Nicola Maffulli, MD, MS, PhD, FRCS(Orth)", "Alessandro Sgambato, MD")

  • 2. Effectiveness of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy in lateral epicondylitis
    (Authors: Kaan Uzunca, Murat Birtane, Nurettin Taştekin)

  • 3. Low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields significantly improve time of closure and proliferation of human tendon fibroblasts
    (Authors: Claudine Seeliger, Karsten Falldorf, Jens Sachtleben and Martijn van Griensven)

  • 4. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field and Exercises in Patients With Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial
    (Authors: "Diego Galace de Freitas, PT, PhD", "Freddy Beretta Marcondes, PT", "Renan Lima Monteiro, PT", "Sabrina Gonc¸alves Rosa, PT", "Patrı´cia Maria de Moraes Barros Fucs, MD, PhD", "Thiago Yukio Fukuda, PT, PhD")

  • 5. Aktas I, Akgun K, Cakmak B. Therapeutic effect of pulsed electromagnetic field in conservative treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome
    (Authors: Ilknur Aktas, Kenan Akgun, Bahar Cakmak)